Member Spotlight: Jaquie Toia

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

SARS-CoV-2 Neutralizing Antibody LY-CoV555 in Outpatients with Covid-19

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

Member Spotlight: Dr. Dele Davies 

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Children

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

PIDS Member Spotlight – Dr. Philip Zachariah


New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

PIDS Honors Eight Distinguished Physicians for Contributions in Clinical Care and Science

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

Association of Nonoperative management Using Antibiotic Therapy vs Laparoscopic Appendectomy with Treatment Success and Disability Days in Children with Uncomplicated Appendicitis

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

PIDS Journal Club – Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis 2015-2017

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

PIDS Member Spotlight – Dr. Annabelle de St. Maurice

New PIDS Educational Offering: The Effective TID Teacher Series

The PIDS Transplant ID Education Subcommittee invites pediatric infectious diseases (PID) educators interested in developing additional teaching strategies for Transplant/Immunocompromised ID (TID) education to participate in “The Effective Transplant ID Teacher”.  In this three-part virtual series, session leaders will use learner vignettes to identify common challenges encountered by clinical educators when teaching TID knowledge and…

Early Exposure to Pediatrics/Pediatric Subspecialties – Survey Request

Hello PIDS Members, There is an Early Exposure Action Team working on improving early exposure to pediatrics and all pediatric subspecialties.  This action team consists of Council of Pediatric Subspecialties (CoPS) and Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) representatives. The Early Exposure Action Team has created a short survey of 25 questions with…

What’s in the News: Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase IIB Trial

Researchers with the University of Oxford recently reported promising findings from a trial of a candidate vaccine against malaria. The randomized, controlled, double-blind phase IIb trial included 450 children aged 5 to 17 months old in Burkina Faso in 2019. Split into three groups, the first two groups of participants received the R21/Matrix-M vaccine (with…

What’s in the News

A recent study in Pediatrics found that children of lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic ethnicity, and Black race were at increased risk for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which has been associated with COVID-19. Published April 28, the retrospective case-control study included 43 patients diagnosed with MIS-C between January 1 and September 2, 2020, at…

PIDS Endorses New Terminology: Vancomycin Flushing Syndrome

PIDS supports the universal removal of the term “red man syndrome,” a term previously used to describe the syndrome of histamine release caused by rapid infusion of vancomycin, and the erythematous flushing that results in patients with light skin. PIDS supports the universal removal of the slur, and recommends replacing it with “vancomycin flushing syndrome”….

Member Spotlight: Dr. Tanya Rogo

Tanya Rogo, MD, MPH&TM, FAAP is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. She practices pediatric infectious diseases at the BronxCare Health System in the Bronx, where she serves as the associate program director of the pediatric residency program, and the director of the curriculum…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Cases Linked to Youth Sports As Vaccine May Soon Be Authorized for Adolescents 12 and Older

Public health officials are seeing an increase in reports of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. linked to youth sports, according to an April 9 press briefing. These include cases in Michigan, which saw 291 outbreaks stemming from youth sports teams that involved at least 1,000 people between January and March. In Minnesota, state health official…

PIDS Invitation to the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Networking Session – May 11

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society invites you to a Networking Session for medical students, residents, fellows, and faculty on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 from 3-4 pm CST.  During the session, you will hear from ID leaders and experts from across the United States.  This is also a chance to network with other professionals and make new…

What’s in the News: COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women

A new study found that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines generated robust humoral immunity in pregnant and lactating women, similar to that observed in women who are not pregnant. The research also found vaccine-generated antibodies in umbilical cord blood and breast milk after maternal vaccination. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study provides…

Why We Should All Support Our Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

John BradleyDecember 2020 I am very honored and humbled by receipt of the Society’s award this past year, which was quite unexpected as I have certainly not made a particular unique, important advance or discovery in our field (which many others in our Society have indeed accomplished), but perhaps that I have done my best…

Tribute to Dr. Kwang Sik Kim

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Kwang Sik Kim, the Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Kim was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg…

Mar. 26, 2021

President’s Letter from Dr. Kris Bryant

We all look forward to March. For some, it’s all about basketball and March Madness. For others, it is about the first day of spring and the promise of better weather. In Kentucky, where I live, that can mean daffodils blooming in the yard one day and a random snowstorm the next. For me, one…

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